Macclesfield Community History

The Lemar's

Also see Glimpses of the Past - John Lemar, as told to Betty White

The White's and Lemar's, probably by Ray Risely
Oswald Lemar; A Tribute, by Gerald O'Callaghan
Lemar Family from our publication "Macclesfield Jubilee 1840-1990 Families Old and New"
• The Lemar Family Tree. Editing in progress :)      (Could be a slow process - much to add.)

NOTE: Nat and Paul Lemar have done massive family research over the years, providing us with a 158 page Word document! They are related to many of the old families of Macclesfield and so their story is a valuable genealogical resource for this area. Data has been derived from various genealogical sources (eg. Ancestry.com) and from Trove, the Australian history database, as well as government War Records.

Past newspapers have been scanned or photographed and placed on the Trove website. OCR (Optical Character Recognition) software has been used to convert the text in the images to actual text that can be edited in eg Word. But, it doesn't always do a good job! There are many spelling errors in the text on Trove! Gradually we will add Nat's 158 pages, but be aware that you may need to do further research to guarantee accuracy. (And let us know any inaccuracies please).


The White's & Lemar's

From "The White's & Lemar's.ppp", a Macclesfield Newsletter article, probably by Ray Risely, a past member.

This is the third in our series, highlighting the story of some of the pioneers of our local district, through the photos of old homes or ruins, where they lived and brought up their families.

The White’s
Patrick and Margaret White (nee Hogan) lived for quite some time in the house pictured here, out on Shady Grove Road, before eventually relocating into Venables Street in Macclesfield.

White's house at Paris Creek

White’s house in Paris Creek

Among the children in the family, the following were born in or near Macclesfield.

Edward & Edmund 14th Nov 1868
Bridget 18th Oct 1870
Patrick 18th Sep 1872
Ellen 23rd May 1875
Ann 27th May 1881

There may also have been a Michael born c1867, a Catherine, a Margaret, and a Thomas who we understand lived only for one month. As far as we are able to ascertain none of the children are recorded as having married here in South Australia and therefore, we know of no descendants.

J.T. Kerslake Sen. bought the Paris Creek property and an Italian employee of his, one Tony Donati, lived in the house whilst working for him.  In October of 1939, the Ferrarese family moved in, share-farming the property and eventually buying it. The Ferrarese family later built a new house on the opposite side of the road, which is still occupied today by well-known Macclesfield identity Mario Ferrarese.

In the St John’s Catholic Church here in Macclesfield, one of the windows is dedicated to Patrick and Margaret White.

The Lemar’s
The photograph below is of a house belonging to one branch of the Lemar family and it was also situated out on Shady Grove Road, in the area of Tea Tree Swamp as it was known back in earlier days.

Shady Grove Road property

Lemar's Shady Grove taken 2012

Lemar's Shady Grove house, taken 2012

Thomas Lemar, a shoemaker and gardener, arrived in SA from Canterbury England in 1837 and, in 1852 along with his two sons, John Thomas and William, purchased a considerable parcel of land in the area known as Shady Grove.

Thomas was apparently quite well known as a successful cultivator and was mentioned in Loyau’s book “Representative Men of South Australia”. The text reads: -
"LEMAR, THOMAS, One of the early South Australian pioneers. He arrived by the ship Resource in 1837, and was one of the first settlers at the Black Forest, and afterwards of Macclesfield, where he resided till the time of his death, which occurred January, 1882, in his eighty-second year. Mr. Lemar may be regarded as a very successful cultivator and horticulturist, and he for many years in succession carried off prizes at the Mount Barker and Strathalbyn Shows."

His son John Thomas married a Sarah Wood, and between 1859 and 1882 they raised nine children in the area, whilst the other son William, married Ann Norah Carey, on the 16th of July 1856 at the home of his father Thomas, out at Tea Tree Swamp and they had some seven children who were also born in the Macclesfield area.

Lemar is of course still a well-known family name in Macclesfield. Mention of the early family is made in the book “Macclesfield, Reflections along the Angas”.

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Oswald Lemar; A Tribute, by Gerald O'Callaghan

from a document by Ray and/or Shirley Risely, about 2009


Oswald George Lemar

During History Week (22-31 May) the three churches in Macclesfield intend once again to cooperate in conducting a history walk, during which the walkers will be invited to visit the churches in Macclesfield and view the exhibitions arranged in each. In preparation for the event, articles relating to past church and town personalities will appear in the Macclesfield Newsletter. This first tribute features some memories of Oswald (Os) Lemar.

Except for the years when he served in the Australian army in the Pacific, Ossie spent his life in Macclesfield (1922- 1987). But it is not for his work as factory hand, farmer or RSL President that he is primarily remembered, but for the way he lived his life and for the very moment of his dying.

He loved people; wife Roma, sons Graham and Paul of course, as well as the wider circle around him. He seemed to be there when others needed him. Even in later years when he himself was sick, he would visit those who were housebound to ask for jobs that he could do on their behalf.  He was seen as a merry man, making many witty interruptions at meetings and always prepared to tell a good story.

Even the night before his first heart bypass operation he invited his family to drink to his "good health", for tomorrow, he said with strange foresight, "the lights go out". True enough, just before his operation, Adelaide had a complete power failure and hospitals had to turn to emergency power.

The premonitions continued. On a Saturday a friend went searching for Os. The sure place to find him was at the church, working. That particular morning he was mowing the grass around the Catholic church in preparation for the following Sunday. "You'll die in this place one day", quipped his friend. "What better place could you chose?" rejoined Os.

The next day, October lst 1989, after receiving the Eucharist and wine himself, Os moved with the priest to distribute communion to the congregation. Among the first to receive the host was his sister, Win, then he slowly crumpled to the floor ensuring not a drop of wine was spilt.

Efforts to revive him by First Aid members in the church and later ambulance attendants were unsuccessful. The visiting priest anointed him before his body was removed. He then baptized baby Simon Thomas: one soul entered eternal life and another began the journey.

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Lemar Family

from our publication Macclesfield Jubilee 1840-1990 Families Old and New

Thomas LEMAR and his sons William and John arrived in South Australia in 1837. By 1852 they owned land at Paris Creek, naming it "Shady Grove". The family were well known horticulturalists and won many prizes for their produce. Thomas died in 1882 and by 1909 the property had grown to 147 acres and had been passed down to three descendants - Alfred, William and George.

George married Mary NESTOR, the daughter of a pioneering family and they continued to live on the property. They had one child, Edmund, who, when old enough, helped to deliver vegetables to Strathalbyn and Milang; a two day round trip with a wagon and two horses. As a sideline they burnt marble to produce building lime. George passed away in 1931 and Mary in 1953.

Edmund and his wife Dorothy and their children, Betty, Oswald and Winifred moved to Bugle Ranges in January 1934; Dorothy died in March of the same year. Their children were educated at the Wistow School and later at the Convent at Macclesfield - walking both ways in all weather.

After returning from service in World War II, Oswald married Roma SMITH of Norwood and their two sons Graham and Paul were educated at Macclesfield and at Mt. Barker High School. The family are well known in local sporting circles, Graham for football and cricket and Paul for football, cricket and softball. Since retiring from tennis Roma plays bowls with the Meadows Bowling Club. "Os" passed away in 1989; he had been a familiar figure 'around' Macclesfield, always with a smile and a cheerful joke despite his health problems.

Winifred married Ron MOTT and still lives in Macclesfield and Betty, now Betty HENLEY, lives in Western Australia.

During his lifetime, their father Edmund, was a prominent figure in the Macclesfield Rifle Club as well as being a lifelong supporter of all the town activities - including fifteen years as a starter for the athletic events at the New Years Day Picnic.

Nestor Bible

Nestor Bible 1886


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas LeMar & Mary Gobell Marriage Certificate

Thomas LeMar & Mary Gobell Marriage Certificate. Link to larger .pdf copy here.

 

LeMar cross front and back

LeMar family cross front and back.

 

 

 

John Thomas & Sarah LeMar

John Thomas and Sarah LeMar

 

 

 

 

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THE LEMAR FAMILY TREE

Generation 1

SAMUEL LEMAR, baptized 1742 St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. He married Ann WILDBORE on the 8th December 1765 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. Ann died 9th March 1802 and is buried St Mary's Church, Northgate, Broad Street, Canterbury, Kent, England. Samuel died 22nd December 1803 and is buried St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

SAMUEL LEMAR & ANN WILDBORE had 8 children: -

ROBERT WILDBORE LEMAR, baptized 4th October 1767 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. He married Mary FIELD 29th November 1789 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. Mary was born in 1767 in Northgate, England. In later years they were living at Broad St Passage, Northgate. Robert died 24th November 1839 and is buried in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. Mary died 25th June 1837 in Northgate and is buried in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England

ANN LEMAR, baptized 17th September 1769 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. Ann died 3rd October 1772 and is buried St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

SUSANNA LEMAR, baptized 1st September 1771 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

JOHN LEMAR baptized 23rd October 1774 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

WILLIAM LEMAR baptized 26th May 1776 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

SOPHIA LEMAR baptized 19th July 1780 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

SAMUEL LEMAR baptized 10th March 1784 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

ANN LEMAR baptized 25th July 1787 in St Mary's Church, Northgate England. Ann died 28th October 1791 and is buried St Mary's Church, Northgate. England.

 

Generation 2

SAMUEL WILDBORE LEMAR (Robert Wildbore)

JOHN LEMAR, baptized 1790 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. John died 28th October 1791 Northgate and is buried St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

JOHN THOMAS LEMAR, baptized 22nd April 1792 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. John died 18th March1796 Northgate and is buried St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

MARY ANN LEMAR, baptized 6th April 1794 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

ANN LEMAR, born 1796 Northgate, England.

WILLIAM LEMAR, baptized 20th April 1798 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. He married Charlotte CHEESEMAN 23rd October 1820 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England.

THOMAS WILLIAM LEMAR, baptized 13th July 1801 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. He was a Cordwainer. He married Mary Anne (Ellen) GOBLE (GOBELL), 29th June 1828 in St Mary's Church, Northgate, England. The officiating minister was John Birt Brian and they signed in the presence of John Gobell and Mary Ann Brian. Mary was born in 1810 in Northgate, England. Thomas was a shoemaker and gardener in Northgate St Canterbury, England.

Thomas applied to come to Australia and on the 7th October 1838 Thomas, Mary, Thomas Jnr, John and Jane left London on the teak-built barque "Resource", Application 3003, Embarkment 1627, and they arrived in Pt Adelaide, SA, on the 23rd January 1839. On the voyage over, of the 2700 sheep on board destined for Mr. D. Macfarlane's of NSW, 2280 were lost.

They first settled at Black Forest. On the 22nd May 1846 Thomas was issued with a Protection Notice as tenant of No.109, District B, County of Adelaide. Pursuant to section 28 of the Act of Council No. 8, 4th Victoria, being "An Act to authorise and regulate the Impounding of Cattle." This notice was to protect land that was not enclosed with good and sufficient fences.

They then lived for a brief time in Glenelg, SA. On 11th December 1848 Thomas and Mary Ann were assaulted by Mitchell at the Forrest Inn on Glenelg Rd. Mitchell struck Thomas and Mary Ann then spat in Mitchells face, which resulted in Mitchell striking her with a clenched fist. Mary Ann required medical attention from the result. They went to court on the 28th of December with Mitchell being fined £5 and taken into custody.

CRIMINAL JURISDICTION
Thomas Mitchell, labourer, Edward's Town Road, appeared to the complaint of Thomas LeMar for assaulting him and Mary Anne, his wife, at the 'Forrest Inn,' Glenelg Road, on the 11th December. Mr Poulden for the complainants (LeMars). Mr Stephen for the defendant (Mitchell), who pleaded not guilty. Thomas LeMar stated that he called with his wife on Tuesday, the 11th instant, at the ' Forest Inn,' on his way from town. Thomas Mitchell came out of the house and said he wanted a word with him. Thomas Lemar declined the conference, and then Mitchell struck him on each cheek with his open hand. He also struck Mary Ann Lemar. Mitchell said he had been transported for seven years for robbing the Queen, of her shoe strings, and he did not mind transportation or imprisonment so long as he had his revenge.

By Mr Stephen - I did not see Mary Ann Lemar spit in the Mitchells face, nor did she kick Mitchell on the shin. He accused both Lemar and his wife of traducing him. He struck Mary Ann Lemar with his clenched fists. The witness here laughed outright, and Mr Stephen sat down, saying, his Worship could scarcely take the matter seriously when Thomas Lemar only considered it a joke. Mary Ann LeMar gave a similar statement. She did spit in defendants face after be struck her.

Dr Cotter stated that he had attended Mary Ann since the assault. She was still under treatment, and in fact it was scarcely prudent of her to be there that day. That was the Lemars' case. Mr Stephen said the Lemars had summoned two witnesses, who, although in attendance, had not been called. His Worship said well then, you call them. Mr Stephen would wish to hear their statements, yet it was scarcely prudent to call adverse witnesses. He called William Hodges, bullock driver, who stated that he saw the whole affair. Mitchell asked the LeMars what they had to say about him, and Mrs Lemar spit in his face. Mitchell then struck Thomas LeMar and Mary pitched into him. John Carpenter gave a similar account of that transaction. Mitchell stated that in speaking to Mrs LeMar he blew in her face, and she spat in his, and the assault arose from that.

Mr Stephen — Oh that's nothing. He merely blew in the woman's face. His Worship — What do you call a blow in the face, nothing? Mr Stephen said it was a most trumpery complaint. The offence and assault proceeded from the Lemars. Lemar himself could not refrain from laughing at the absurdity of his own complaint. His Worship, on the contrary, thought it a very severe assault, and one not justified even if Mary Ann had spit in Mitchells face. His Worship saw the Lemars that night, and could say the complaint was not a trumpery one. He would fine Mitchell £5. Mr Stephen hoped his Worship would remit a portion of the fine. Mitchell was a mere day labourer, and the assault if not trumpery was still slight. Mitchell asked tor time to pay the fine. He was without money. His Worship could give no time and the man was removed in custody.

 

In 1850 they lived at the Bay Rd, Glenelg. In 1852 Thomas and his sons, William and John purchased section 3343 in the Green Hills Special Survey in an area called "Shady Grove". This land was first advertised on the 8th April 1851. By 1852 they owned the land at Paris Creek naming it "Shady Grove". His sons; John and William owned a 13 ½ acres section each in the middle of the land.

This land consisted of all soil types; quick sand, pure white sand, black soil, red hard soil and a lot of brown soil. 6 acres of this land was a rich Teatree Swamp which after years of toil in clearing and draining they created a valuable vegetable garden. In March 1855 at the Mt Barker show Thomas presented a great variety of kitchen vegetables, including horse-radish, parsley, mint, sage, marjoram, tomatoes, carrots, turnips, radishes, green peas, and pickling cabbages. In September of the same year a gigantic white stone turnip radish, which measured upwards of two feet four inches in circumference was pulled in a garden situated in the Teatree Swamp, near Macclesfield, the property of Thomas Lemar. This radish was not, as may be supposed from its extraordinary dimensions, spongy, or hollow inside, but was perfectly sound and edible, and admirably adapted to assist in the composition of a salad. The soil on which it grew was new ground, without a particle of manure, thus proving the fertility of some of our Australian valleys.

Thomas had been long famous for the size and excellence of the potatoes raised on his property, and some of the vegetable productions which he grew were astonishing. On 16th April 1855 Thomas was granted a slaughtering license. Thomas had produce in the Strathalbyn Show in 1857. Thomas raised nearly 30 tons of potatoes from 3 acres of land; many of them weighing 2 lb, and some 2 lb.10 oz in early April 1856.

They were well known horticulturalists and won many prizes for their produce. Thomas was sufficiently well known to be noted in Loyau's book Representative Men of South Australia, published in 1883, where he was described as a very successful cultivar and horticulturalist who for many years in succession had won prizes at the Mt Barker and Strathalbyn Shows.

• In August of the same year Thomas laid 2 complaints to the Macclesfield District Council about Mr Clark junior for splitting gums on surveyed land without a license.
• On the 16th of October 1858 a letter was written to Thomas by the Macclesfield District Council informing Thomas of the new road which was to go through his and his sons land property section 3343 Hundred of Macclesfield.
• In November of the same year James Stubbs took Thomas to the Strathalbyn Criminal court charging Thomas with refusing to pay him £1 5s for wages due. The court ordered Thomas to pay £2 14s.
• November 1860 Thomas and Mary appeared in the police court in Adelaide. Mary had threatened to burn the house down in which they lived. Mary attempted to put her threats in execution by setting fire to several pieces of clothing and the bed clothes. She was prevented from accomplishing this by her husband, Thomas. Mary complained that Thomas was in the habit of ill treating her. His Worship told Mary that "it was in her power to appeal to the nearest Justice of the Peace for address, but she must not seek it in the manner she had attempted". He ordered her to find 2 sureties for 10/ each to keep the peace for 3 months.

Mary died 6th September 1863 in Macclesfield SA and is buried in St Johns Anglican Cemetery, Macclesfield SA.

Thomas then married Charlotte FARR nee SADLER 25th November 1864 at the residence of Mr Simms, North Adelaide. Charlotte was the daughter of Joseph SADDLER and was born in 1814. She was previously married to George William FARR, a bricklayer and they arrived on the same ship as Thomas, the "Resource" in 1839.

Thomas died 20th January 1882 in Fullarton SA from paralysis and is buried in the St Johns Anglican Cemetery, Macclesfield SA with his wife, Mary.

Charlotte died 16th March 1887 in Adelaide SA. She had been in the colony for 49 years

HENRY LEMAR baptized 20th June 1802 in St Mary's Church, Northgate England. He married Jane. Henry was a gardener and in the 1861 English Census was living at 10 Wincheap Street Canterbury Kent

MARY LEMAR baptized 12th February 1803 in St Mary's Church, Northgate England

MARIA ANN LEMAR baptized 8th March 1805 in St Mary's Church, Northgate England

CHARLOTTE LEMAR baptized 25th December 1806 in St Mary's Church, Northgate England

EDWARD LEMER baptized 14th July 1809 in St Mary's Church, Northgate England. Edward died 24th May 1810 Northgate and is buried in St Mary's Church, Northgate England

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Generation 3 (first in Australia)

THOMAS WILLIAM LEMAR (Samuel, Robert Wildbore)

WILLIAM THOMAS LEMAR born 1829 Northgate England. He was baptized 12th June 1829 St Mary Northgate Canterbury Parish. He lived in Northgate St Canterbury, England with his parents and siblings. On the 7th October 1838 Thomas, Mary, William, John and Jane left London on the teak-built barque "Resource", Application 3003, Embarkment 1627 and they arrived in Pt Adelaide SA on the 13th May 1839.

In 1852 he purchased the family land of 122 acres with his brother, John and father, Thomas. Section 3342 and 3343 in the Green Hills Special Survey in an area called "Shady Grove". William & John owned a 13 ½ acres section each in the middle of the land. This land had part of a swamp on it that they named Tea Tree Swamp. The water here was 2 to 3 feet high and you could push a rod down into the ground well over 6 feet with just your weight on it. This is where they grew their vegetables in the black soil. A few yards away from the swamp was the blue marble on top of the ground and shortly after the marble was very hard red soil. In 1854 William and John purchased lots 81 and 93 in Macclesfield comprising of a ¼ acre each for £50.

He married Ann Norah (Hanorah) CAREY on 16th July 1856 at Thomas Lemar's Residence, Tea Tree Springs, Macclesfield SA. Anne was born 21st June 1827 in St Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Anne arrived on the "Inconstant" from Plymouth, England 7th June 1849. She left the poverty of Ireland as part of the Earl Grey's Pauper Immigration Scheme. They built a home made of local materials; off cut gum slabs, straw thatching and mortar that used Paris Creek Lime.

In 1860 William and his brother John sold lots 81 and 93 in the township of Macclesfield. In 1897 he also built a garden shed made from off cut gum slabs and thatched roof that they stored garden tools in. They were well known horticulturalists and won many prizes for their produce. On 25th December 1867 William advertised "All Goats, Pigs and Poultry on section 3341, Hundred of Kondoparinga, will be destroyed".

William died 13th September 1887 in Macclesfield SA and is buried in St Johns Anglican Cemetery, Macclesfield SA. His 3 sons; George, Alfred & William inherited their fathers 40 acres (half section 3343 Hundred of Macclesfield). Anne died 18th March 1913 in Macclesfield SA and is buried in St Johns Anglican Cemetery, Macclesfield SA.

In July 1913 the trustees in the estate of William advertised for auction by Mr E.J Tucker of Strathalbyn; part allotment 87 in the main street of Macclesfield with a four-bedroom house and a two roomed shop that had been erected thereon. The area of the block was; 1 Rood and 12 Perches (1/4 acre).

JOHN THOMAS LEMAR born July 13th 1831 Northgate, Kent England. In 1852 he purchased the family land of 122 acres with his brother, William and father, Thomas. Section 3343 in the Green Hills Special Survey in an area called "Shady Grove". John and William owned a 13 ½ acres section each in the middle of the land. This land had part of a swamp on it that they named TeaTree Swamp. The water here was 2 to 3 feet high and you could push a rod down into the ground well over 6 feet with just your weight on it. This is where they grew their vegetables in the black soil. A few yards away from the swamp was the blue marble on top of the ground and shortly after the marble was very hard red soil.

In 1854 he went to the gold diggings in Victoria during the gold rush but only stayed six months, returning to Paris Creek. He married Sarah Ellen WOOD on 10th May 1855 in the Trinity Church, Adelaide SA in the presence of James & Elizabeth RHODES and the certificate was signed by Charles MARAGETT, Colonial Chaplin of the church. Sarah was born 1st February 1837 Kangaroo Island while her parents were waiting for the ship to come on to Holdfast Bay to land.

In 1854 John and William purchased lots 81 and 93 in Macclesfield comprising of a ¼ acre each for £50. John and Sarah built a home on the North West corner of Section 3343 made of local materials; off cut gum slabs, straw thatching and mortar that used Paris Creek Lime. In 1860 John and his brother William sold lots 81 and 93 in the township of Macclesfield. At the 14th Annual Strathalbyn Show in 1879 John won first prize in the 4 bushells Field Peas exhibition. In 1897 he also built a garden shed made from off cut gum slabs and thatched roof that they stored garden tools in. This was on the garden side of the swamp. They were well known horticulturalists and won many prizes for their produce.

In 1905 John & Sarah celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary at their residence, Fern Hill, Macclesfield SA. In 1912 John still owned 40 acres of the original section 3343, with the Lemar brother's (his nephew's) George, Alfred & William owning the other 40 acres.

Sarah died 11th January 1912 Fern Hill, Macclesfield SA and is buried in St Johns Anglican Cemetery, Macclesfield SA. Sarah was well renowned for her flower exhibits. An article written in the Advertiser read; Mrs. J. T. Lemar, an old and respected resident of the Meadows South district, died at her residence, Paris Creek on Friday at the age of 75 years. Mrs. Lemar was born in South Australia. Her father, Mr. Joshua Wood, served at the battle of Waterloo. Mrs. Lemar was an only daughter, and lived with her parents at Prospect until she was ten years of age, when she came to Paris Creek. Shortly after, the family moved to Finniss, where they remained for seven years. Returning to Paris Creek Miss Wood married Mr. Lemar and has resided there ever since.

John died 19th May 1912 at his residence, Paris Creek SA, and is buried in St Johns Anglican Cemetery, Macclesfield SA. His land was inherited by his son James.

JANE ELIZABETH LEMAR born 1834 Northgate England. She was baptized 26th January 1834 St Mary Northgate Canterbury Parish. She married Henry COLYER on 27th August 1850 in the Independent Chapel Macclesfield SA. Henry was born 15th June 1824 in Kent England. Henry died on 4th October 1872 in Hamilton VIC. She then married Sandy Alexander CAMERON 25th July 1873 Hamilton VIC. They moved to Kalangadoo in 1894. Jane died 5th February 1910 in Kalangadoo SA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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